Postpartum Depression Stop Breastfeeding

For decades, researchers have postulated a link between breastfeeding and the postpartum depression (PPD). Many have suggested that breastfeeding may protect against postpartum depression and suggested that the interruption of breastfeeding can cause postpartum depression or anxiety. Research, association between postpartum depression and to consider breastfeeding has been a little difficult to interpret. It is not clear how the risk of PPD affects breastfeeding. Many studies that have shown a link between the extension of the duration of breastfeeding and a lower prevalence of PPD; However, other studies have shown that breastfeeding no PPD are protected many of these earlier studies were based on small samples and some possible subsidiaries of confounding factors such as socio-economic factors (education, income level, marital status), social media and stressful life events. It is therefore difficult to determine whether breast feeding reduces the risk of PPD or, on postpartum depression stop breastfeeding the other side the success of breastfeeding among mothers more often to reduce the risk of PPD - such as those with multiple media and less stressful life. Most existing studies have not controlled for pre-existing mental conditions. There is, however, we are collecting data that affect the indices still depression and maternal anxiety and may reduce the duration of breastfeeding. Until today (Ystrom 2012), one of the largest studies observed that a very vulnerable population was women who have experienced depression or anxiety during pregnancy. Not only were more to stop breastfeeding, most likely, a worsening of symptoms were the early termination of breastfeeding. Study the data on mothers of a parents and children (ALSPAC) Avon longitudinal study of the United Kingdom, most of the effects of silence 8 weeks measured on the mental health of the mother and 8 researchers examined, 21 and 32 months after the birth. The effects of breastfeeding on depressive symptoms was mediated by levels of mothers to breastfeed. For mothers who were not depressed during pregnancy, found the lowest risk of PPD in women who had planned and nursing their babies successfully. The increased risk was found among women who wanted to give the breast, but not going to do not to breastfeed their babies. Curiously, it is the risk of PPD in women who had no intention of breastfeeding, but stopped after childbirth. The results were a little different in the Group of women who were depressed during pregnancy. Although the attention of the authors in the interpretation of these data that the sample size was convened so small that it seems that the risk of PPD in their silence was low. Women l ' breastfeeding. This study is correlated with clinical, what we see. Watch you want women who are breastfeeding and breastfeeding are not perfectly well without. On the contrary, women seem to eventful, able to satisfy the offenders, not one, despite many of the chest, difficulties and ultimately. Although most of the studies unable to capture this variable, it seems that there is a significant difference between what was expected or planned and what actually past that increase women's vulnerability to the DPP can spend a lot of things a scheduled c-section, complications at birth, a child who has medical problemsthe difficulties of breastfeeding; -all this can be destabilizing and the trigger for depression in women, especially those who have not supported properly. Ruta Nonacs, MD C, PhDBorra M, IAH Seville to new discoveries about breastfeeding and postpartum depression: the importance of understanding the intentions of women. The health of the baby to spaghetti j. August 21, 2014 [Epub ahead of print] share this article: EmailPrintMorePocketRelated PostsBreastfeeding and postpartum depression: what is the link?Prevention of depression during the PregnancyVenlafaxine of maternity leave after the birth of the DepressionShorter risk after the birth of DepressionObesity, as regards the risk of associated with postpartum depression. . . . .